It’s Just Cake people!

Just had to repost this article.  Such a good way to put food in perspective and develop a healthy relationship with it.  Wonderful testimony.  She and I are on the same page, this is what I love to help people do in their own lives!!!  Let me know how I can help you.

It’s Just Cake: How a Fat Loss Foodie Lifestyle Ended my Food Obsession
Leslie Ann Quillen October 27, 2015

I’ve been a foodie for as long as I can remember. Even as a little kid, I was fascinated by food.

When I was very little, I went through a phase where my answer to “What do you want to be when you grow up?” was “a pizza maker.”

I remember during Grandparent’s Day in first grade, my teacher Mrs. Robey had us make a book – complete with our own illustrations – about what we would do if we could spend the whole day with our grandparents.

I was not like the rest of the kids, who were planning out trips to zoos and amusement parks with grandma and grandpa.

Instead, my ideal day with my grandparents included a picnic and them taking me for ice cream, and probably a few other food-related activities as well.

My favorite birthday party? I don’t remember the little girl’s name or where I knew her from, but she had her birthday party at a pizza parlor and we got to go in the kitchen and learn how to throw dough and make our own pizzas from scratch. It was the best party I ever went to.

Food has always interested me. Learning where it comes from and how to make it. Spending time talking to the people who grow and raise our food. Preparing it, and then bringing people together to share it. I love it all.


Somewhere along the way, late in high school I think, I became aware that food wasn’t all fun and games. I suddenly learned that food could cause me to gain weight, to go up a clothing size, to not look as cute or feel as confident as the other girls.

By college and the years that followed, I was in a full-on war with food.

During my internship in DC, we had Speaker Nights at the intern house that included home cooked dinners and always – always – some kind of pre-made/frozen dessert the intern parents had picked up from Costco. I considered it a badge of honor that I skipped dessert every week, and I remember the one time I didn’t. I stayed up until 1 a.m. running on the treadmill in the apartment gym to burn off the slice of cake.

Fast forward 15 years later, and thank goodness, my war with food is over and behind me. My unhealthy past relationship with food was one of the driving forces in becoming a nutrition coach: I didn’t want other women (especially young girls) to go through what I had gone through. Having a greater understanding of the impact food has on our hormones helped complete my healing process and put my food issues to rest.

They are still there of course, always lingering in the background.

I was reminded of them one night recently when my husband brought home a slice of cake for dessert as part of our “at-home date night.”

It wasn’t just any cake. It was chocolate cake. German chocolate cake, people…

Here is the aftermath:

One slice of cake. Two people. Two forks. And that is what remained.

You may be thinking:

“HOW DO YOU DO THAT?! How do you just leave perfectly good cake?! Wasn’t it good?! Then why didn’t you keep eating it?!
Here’s my why:

Because it’s just cake and it doesn’t have any power over me.

Since becoming a certified fat loss nutrition coach and personal trainer, I’ve worked with hundreds of women with food histories much like my own.


Because I didn’t see many nutrition coaches and trainers sharing recipes from Nigella Lawson or Bon Appetit magazine, I started to carve out a niche for myself with female foodies who wanted to get and stay lean while still enjoying cooking, eating, and sharing real food.


If you are seeking freedom from food, a Fat Loss Foodie Lifestyle can help you achieve hormonal balance and practice new behaviors around food.

Here are three principles I use in my coaching that help women overcome their food issues:


There are no “good foods” or “clean foods,” because it’s all ultimately just food. No labels, no emotions necessary. There is no school of thought or “team” that is better than any other (for example, Team Paleo vs. Team Vegan vs. Team If It Fits Your Macros) because we can all peacefully coexist AND achieve fat loss using any one of those approaches, as long as we honor our own unique metabolic expression, personality, and preferences.

Focus on eating more of the things that work for you and make you feel and perform your best, and limit the food that doesn’t serve you. For example, if you discover that dairy foods make you feel bloated and cause you to break out, that doesn’t mean you can never eat another bite of ice cream. It just means that on a daily basis, you can find ways to reduce your dairy intake and replace it with other things that work FOR you.

Make no mistake: Treat meals are part of a fat loss lifestyle, too, and we make a big deal out of our weekly pizza night or pasta night or burger night and make it an EVENT. Food should be celebrated and enjoyed, not eaten in secret and shame.


Look around you. Chances are, you could acquire food with very little effort, in very little time, from where you’re sitting right now as you read this. You probably have food in your bag, your desk, or a few steps away in the kitchen or office fridge. There’s probably a restaurant or convenience store or coffee shop just minutes away.

Here in America, food is everywhere we turn. So why do we eat as if it’s our last meal and we’ll never ever have another opportunity to eat a slice of pizza, a piece of cake, or a cookie? Why do we have to EAT IT ALL RIGHT NOW?

Last night, when I was indulging in a few bites of that insanely good German Chocolate Cake, I knew I didn’t have to scarf it down or eat it all. The bakery is a few blocks away. It’s not going anywhere. I can have it any time I want if that’s what I choose.

It’s just cake. And just because something tastes good, doesn’t mean you have to eat ALL of it.


There is a law in economics that states the more abundant a product is to consumers, the less they will want it. As supply goes up, demand goes down.

Apply this law the next time you’re face to face with a slice of chocolate cake, or any highly-palatable food that you feel driven to consume in its entirety.

Notice how the first bite, the second bite, the third bite – are sheer HEAVEN, but as you continue eating, it becomes less enjoyable. You keep eating more and more in search of that “pleasure fix” you got from the first bite, but it’s not there. It’s usually around the 4th or 5th bite for me, which is exactly where I stopped last night.

That’s when you put down your fork. Close the container. Walk to the fridge. Put it away for tomorrow when you can enjoy a few bites all over again.
I’m glad my guy brought home that slice of cake. It allowed me to reflect on how far I’ve come and how I can use what I’ve learned to help others. Now I welcome opportunities to practice making choices that serve me well, that give me freedom and make me feel powerful.

Cake doesn’t have ANY power over me, and it shouldn’t have any power over you.

It’s just cake.

Homemade Indian King Masala Powder

Indian Spices

I love incorporating new spices into my cooking because the taste is undeniably different and adds variety to any meal plan.  Thanks to the internet, we can now gather ideas from all over the world.  Here’s a little example of a spice combination from a blog I follow.  Thank you youreverydaycookradha and foodbod!

Indian Spices2

mixing and roasting your own spice mixes is easy and adds such a punch of taste to any dish.  The hardest part is finding the spices listed in your local area.  Now with an new indian market down the street and the H Mart within a short drive, I was able to gather the few ingredients i was missing.  Reheating the dried spices I gathered gives them new life and enhances the flavor.  No need for the scented candle today!!!

You can certainly reheat any spices you use in any recipe to freshen up the taste and add more bang to your recipe (doesn’t have to be spicy either).  Often doing this will rev up the nutrient boost in addition to bringing more flavor to your cooking.

Happy Nutrition Month!  Let me know if you try this mix.


“What’s The Truth” Workshop

The next two days are your last chance to sign up for my next nutrition workshop, “What’s The Truth.”  This 1.5 hour workshop will help you make sense of the myths and truths about nutrition today.  We are constantly bombarded by new “studies” claiming to have the best tips about food and nutrition.  I will discuss what is true and what is hype. Bring your questions and join us this Thursday from 6:30-8pm at the Trails Recreation Center in Aurora. These workshops are a reduced rate of $25 for all participants.  (Childcare available)

Online registration:

Select “fitness” from categories on left

then fill in  class # 463, “What is Really True”


Or Contact: Trails Recreation Center to register: (map available on website)

Trails Recreation Center
16799 E. Lake Ave.
Centennial, CO 80016


Grilled Cod with Basil and Tomatoes

This was dinner at my house last night. I was running in the door from picking up my son from practice and didnt have a lot of time to cook.  Fish is one of my favorite “GoTos” for a quick turnaround from grill/oven to plate.  This was a hit with my entire family.  It is mild and flavorful and couldn’t be easier to prepare.  Pair with a side dish of steamed broccoli and brown rice and dinner is served!

Grilled Cod and Shrimp with Basil and Tomatoes

recipe by:

Prep: 10 m      Cook:  10 m    Ready in 20 m


4 fillet cod

12 frozen raw shrimp

salt and ground pepper to taste

 1 tsp garlic powder

1/2 cup fresh basil leaves or 1 cup spinach leaves

2 cups cherry tomatoes, approx. 20

4 Tbs chopped onion (optional)

2 Tbs olive oil

2 Tbs balsamic vinegar


Preheat grill to medium high heat (or oven to 350 degrees).   Place cod piece on aluminum foil and season each lightly with salt, pepper, and garlic powder.  Top cod piece with shrimp, basil (or spinach), 5 tomatoes, and onion.  Drizzle olive oil and balsamic vinegar evenly over all the pieces.  Fold over foil to make packet, crimping the edges together to make a seal.  Place directly on grill grates or on cookie sheet in preheated oven.  Grill until fish flakes with a fork, approx 7-9 minutes.  May need to cook longer if fish was frozen, approx 12-14 minutes.