Super Side Dish – Zucchini Fritters

Zucchini Fritters

recipe by eatlivefit.net

Ingredients:

2 cups shredded zucchini

1/2 cup parmesan cheese

dash of salt and pepper

1 tsp coconut oil, or flavored oils

Directions:

Add olive oil to deep skillet and heat on medium to high heat.  Meanwhile drain shredded zucchini in a strainer (think pressing into a spaghetti strainer here) and then wipe dry on paper towels.  The more moisture you can remove, the better your fritters will bind together and cook.  Next add shredded zucchini and remaining ingredients in a small bowl.  Toss to blend.

To cook, place in 2 tsp portions in pan and brown lightly on both sides.  Using a spatula, turn occasionally to cook thoroughly.  Serve warm.

My take on AHA’s recommended “healthy” fats…

Recently the American Heart Association released it’s updated recommendations for keeping your heart healthy.  Part of the new release reviewed eating habits and more specifically recommended oils to use in a daily diet to prevent cholesterol and cardiovascular disease.  I had to chime in when I reviewed their findings.  As a nutrition guru, several red flags popped up:

  1. Heart disease is a complicated illness.  Inflammation in the body causes increases in cholesterol and other complications leading to the disease.  Genetics play a role as well.  Diet can help reduce inflammation, but it is not the overall solution or culprit.  Read more about it here.
  2. Saturated Fats are not all equal.  The new recommendations vilify Coconut Oil but fail to tout the benefits of this saturated fat in comparison with other saturated fats.  Let’s dive deeper.  Coconut oil is a medium-chain fatty acid.  It is also a saturated fat.  What does that mean, in a nut shell, your body processes it differently.  Coconut oil has proven to raise both HDL and LDL levels in the body.  Thus keeping the ratio of good to poor cholesterol the same.  Lab studies also prove it is less likely to be stored as fatty acids in the body, thus aiding in weight reduction.  Coconut oil contains high amounts of lauric acid, boosting antibacterial properties to aid your immune system.  It helps regulate blood sugar levels and helps your body build strong teeth and bones.
  3. The list of approved oils the AHA are questionable.  They recommend Canola oil, vegetable oil, olive oil and others.  I agree with the Olive Oil, it is a wonderful oil to use in dressings and low heat cooking.  The others use sparingly because they are cheap and used widely in commercially processed foods, restaurant foods, and are most likely from sources of GMO foods.  In other words, we get too much of them already in our diets, so be aware.  It does make you wonder what big industries have an financial influence on the American Heart Association.

When it comes down to it, our bodies are all different.  We have to be our own advocates for our individual health because of these differences.  Do some research into the saturated fats, look deeper than Google and decide for yourself.  I am here to help at eatlivefit.net.

That is what 2000 calories look like!

Sometimes an info blog is a powerful way to get a message across.  For the average person, this is what 2000 calorie healthy diet should resemble.  Thank you My Fitness Blogger for a visual representation.  Is this what you are eating?

http://blog.myfitnesspal.com/2000-calories-looks-like-infographic/?utm_source=mfp&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=weekly20170619

 

 

 

No willpower when it comes to food? Read this. — Eat…Enjoy

‘ The chocolate bar calls my name. No, really – I can’t NOT eat it if it’s in the house.’ Many people I talk to lament that they can’t control themselves when it comes to sugar or junk food – that they don’t have the willpower to say ‘no’ despite their best efforts. This implies […]

via No willpower when it comes to food? Read this. — Eat…Enjoy

Goat Cheese and Date Salad

Freshly back from vacation and excited to share a new salad I discovered at Mod Market, a local fresh food eatery.  This is a great side dish or main dish with a twist.

Date-Salad_635851192470258724

Goat Cheese and Date Salad

4 cups fresh greens (mix of kale, spinach, green and red lettuce)

1 cup dates, pitted and sliced

1/2 cup goat cheese crumbles

1 cup pecan pieces

1 red onion, sliced thinly (optional)

2 cups fingerling potatoes*, cooked, sliced and chilled

Olive Oil

Herbed Balsamic Vinegar (or any flavored vinegar)

Mix all ingredients in a bowl, drizzle with olive oil and balsamic Vinegar and chill until ready to serve.  Serving size 2 handfuls.

* cooking potatoes: place fingerling potatoes in 2 cups of boiling water with a pinch of sea salt.  Boil gently until soft and cooked through.  Rinse with cold water in strainer and chill until cool to the touch.  Slice and top with sea salt and pepper.

 

Lactic Acid and Cancer Growth

This week, new research was published linking lactic acid levels in the body to cancer growth.  Inigo San Millan, an Assistant Professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and the Director of the Sports Performance Program at the CU Sports Medicine and Performance Center in Boulder, Colorado published this study.  The twitter headline read: “Lactate May Be Key For Cancer Development.”  The full article is here: https://academic.oup.com/carcin/article/38/2/119/2709442/Reexamining-cancer-metabolism-lactate-production

My first thought, being an athlete, was is the lactic acid that my body produces when I exercise hard going to encourage cancer to grow in my body?  This is NOT the case.  This research specifically measures the amount of lactic acid surrounding cancer cells.  Here are some important points to consider:

  1. Based on what we know today, when you participate in regular vigorous exercise, your muscles produce lactic acid as a by product of glucose breakdown used to fuel your body.  When lactic acid is present, your body is very efficient at breaking down and removing from the blood stream.  These are short term bursts of lactic acid and are usually broken down quickly as well.  The more active you are regularly, the more efficiently your body rids itself of all lactic acid.  Exercise is a protective measure to rid your body of lactate.
  2. Cancer cells encourage an acidic environment around them to most likely protect them from immune system attacks and to keep the area around them conducive to growth.  This lactic acid is different from the byproduct of glycolysis breakdown when exercising because research suggests this type of lactic acid may be produced by a cancer cell.
  3. Cancer cells are complicated.  Science is constantly finding new ways to help us battle them.  We all carry abnormal cells in our bodies.  The key is, a healthy immune system is excellent at singling these cells out and eliminating them.  We just need to nurture our immune systems with good health and regular exercise to give it as much strength and resilience as possible.  A good first step to good health and cancer prevention.

 

ref: http://trainright.com/lactate-cancer/?utm_source=CTS+Newsletter&utm_campaign=ae9903888c-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_05_13_lactate_cancer&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_9d08d48022-ae9903888c-106337343&mc_cid=ae9903888c&mc_eid=1dc3c8007f