Coconut Lime Rice Side Dish

I found this recipe on a blog that I frequently use for workout ideas. pfit/pfood.  I tried it out and really like the flavor and texture enough to share it with you.  I expect it will become a regular side dish in my house going forward.  Coconut-Rice

Serving Size – 1/2 cup, makes 6-8 servings

New Way to Enjoy Vegetables

If you like pickles, then you have to try this new vegetable snack! I know many of you struggle to find a vegetable you like and one that will fit into your eating.  I just discovered these little bags of pickled vegetables at my store this week.  While I don’t recommend they be the only vegetable you eat, occasionally, they are a decent product to throw into the mix.

Oh Snap Snap Peas

Oh Snap Green Beans

They are perfectly portable and taste good too.  The sodium content is a little higher than ideal, but for a picky veggie eater, not bad.  They were in the refrigerated section at Super Target.  They are also for sale at Sprouts.  If those stores are not near you, check out this link for store locations:       https://www.glkfoods.com/store-locator/

Fall Flavors Salad

As we move into the Fall, try this hearty salad full of fall flavors.

 

Fall Flavors Salad

recipe by: womenshealthmag.com modified by eatlivefit.net

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup salted, shelled pumpkin seeds
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • 1 tbsp plus 1/4 cup olive oil, divided
  • Shredded cooked chicken (optional)
  • 3 sweet potatoes, peeled and grated
  • 2 tbsp red-wine vinegar
  • 1 tbsp dijon mustard
  • 2 tsp honey
  • 1/4 cup raisins

Directions:

Coat seeds with nonstick spray. Sprinkle with chili powder. Roast in the oven at 375F for 5 minutes, or until lightly browned. Heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add sweet potatoes. Lightly cook for 7 minutes. In a bowl, whisk vinegar, mustard, honey, and a dash of chili powder. Whisk in remaining 1/4 cup oil. Add potatoes, cooked chicken, seeds, and raisins. Toss well.

Back To School Means…BTY Time!

This time of year, as we get fall back into routines of school, work, and life, is the perfect time to make lifestyle changes.  Changes that will get results and are long lasting and focused on you.

Time to bring the focus Back To You (BTY)

Introducing

 BTY: Small Group Coaching from eatlivefit.net

As a Certified Nutrition Coach, I will provide online support through weekly conference calls, videos, a private social media group, and motivational texts.  Topics include:

  • Eating real food, limiting additives

  • How to balance the right fats, protein and carbohydrates

  • Keys to avoiding sugar and cravings

  • Helpful hints to make every meal simple and nutrient dense

  • and much more…

Cost: $85 per person for 4 weeks of coaching

Back To School price $69 per person

Interested? Contact me at eatlivefit@hotmail.com

or at (707) 408-3359

Sessions beginning soon! September 2016

Black Rice, Salmon , and Mango Salad

Anytime I can make dinner without turning on the oven and with little effort, I’m in!  This recipe was shared with me by a friend as a easy weeknight dish.  Enjoy.

Black Rice, Spinach, Salmon, and Mango Salad

Ingredients

1½ cups black rice
Cooking spray
1 (8-ounce) salmon fillet (about ½ inch thick)
¼ cup fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon grated peeled fresh ginger
1 garlic clove, minced
2½ tablespoons canola oil
3 cups diced peeled mango (about 2 medium)
1 cup halved grape tomatoes
½ cup thinly sliced green onions
½ cup finely chopped green bell pepper
1 (6-ounce) package fresh baby spinach

Rinse rice, and drain well . Cook rice in boiling water 35 minutes or until al dente; drain. Cool. Heat a nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Add salmon; cook 3 minutes on each side or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork or until desired degree of done¬ness. Cool; break into bite-sized pieces. Combine juice and next 4 ingredients (through garlic) in a large bowl, stirring well with a whisk. Gradually add oil to juice mixture, stirring constantly. Add rice, mango, tomatoes, onions, pepper, and spinach; toss gently. Place 1 cup rice mixture in each of 6 bowls; top each with 1 ounce salmon.

What’s for dinner at your house tonight?  Share your easy summer recipe.

courtesy of keyingredient.com/recipes shared by J. E.

 

Clean Eating Basics

Clean Eating in the Tub

AHHH NOPE!!!  Here are the basics of a clean eating lifestyle:

 

What Exactly Is “Clean Eating?”
For the most part, clean eaters subscribe to these general guidelines:

  1. Eat plenty of vegetables, both raw and cooked.
  2. Eat unprocessed lean meats that have not had anything added. This includes fresh chicken and fish and even lean, humanely raised beef and game.
  3. Enjoy whole grains instead of the processed or refined variety.
  4. Eat smaller, more frequent meals about every 2 1/2 – 3 hours.
  5. Reduce or Eliminate Processed, artificial, preservative laden foods with fresh real food.

Most of the recipes I use and include in this website abide by these rules.  “What about all the treats I love,” you ask?  I am a big proponent of not going cold turkey but to rely on the 80/20 rule.  Eighty percent of the time follow these rules strictly.  Twenty percent of the time, have the burger and fries, or the milkshake, or the glass of wine.  Eat to live, not live to eat.

I am here to help, let me know how…eatlivefit@hotmail.com.

“Eggs”planation: Demystifying the Labeling

Have you noticed that the egg section of the dairy isle has grown tremendously larger in America.  The selection is mind boggling now right along with the rise in price.  Here is a little help when it comes to selecting the best eggs to add to your cart depending on your preferences.

Organic – the hens typically receive organic feed and are not raised in cages.  The feed cannot contain animal byproducts, synthetic fertilizers, sewage sludge, most pesticides and other unsavory ingredients.  Although antibiotics are rarely used int eh egg industry, it is POSSIBLE that organic eggs could come from hens that were given antibiotics ( a slight loophole in the regulation system).  An organic label does not cover humane treatment of the animals.

Free-Range – the hens producing these eggs were raised or are allowed outdoors.  In addition to grains, these hens may eat wild plants, and insects.  The quality of the outdoor area, and how often the hens have access to it are not addressed.

Cage-Free –  Hens are not bound to cages and have unlimited access to food and water.  Conditions vary per facility whether they are outside or inside housing.

Animal Welfare Approved – (AWA) these are from family owned farms that live up to the strictest criteria for hens’ ability to live in their natural state.  This label covers both organic feeding and humane living conditions.

Don’t be fooled by the added ingredients and supplements in eggs either.  “Enriched” eggs are not necessary unless you know you are deficient it a certain nutrient (i.e. omega 3 enriched, or protein enhanced).  By now, you know these marketing labels are often a way to hike up the price or to entice buyers to pick one brand over another.  A diet with a variety of foods is the best approach when you are low in one nutrient or another, not an “enriched” or “enhanced” version of a food.