Clementine Wild Rice Salad

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Consistency is what I encourage!  You will not completely undo nor redo your life in one day and the same is true for eating healthier.  Pick the path and make your long term goal and then go for it one day at a time.  New habits take time to develop and stick, so treat every day as a new day to make good choices.  I can certainly create a lot of damage in 15 minutes of eating poorly, but I move on the next day and make good choices to get back on track with healthy eating habits.  Even if it is not the popular or common choice of the people surrounding me, I can only control what goes in MY body.  I won’t let some one else’s choice to indulge become my choice.  I will be in control my choices, even if they are not the same ones my friends or family choose.  This is my body and my choice.  Master the day.

This is on my plate for lunch today.  Clemetines are one of my favorite snacks, but why not in a salad. Easy, make ahead directions too.  Make it for lunches next week!

Clementine-Wild Rice Salad

12 clementines, peeled and sectioned
1 6-ounce can sliced water chestnuts, drained
2 bunches green onions, sliced thin
2 cups cooked wild rice, chilled
1 cup mint leaves (optional)
1 cup cilantro or Italian parsley leaves (optional)
1/4 cup rice vinegar
juice of 1 lime
1/2 cup mayonnaise, or to taste (optional)
3 cups shredded Chinese cabbage, chopped romaine lettuce or baby spinach leaves (or a combination)

Combine all ingredients except the greens and mix thoroughly. Toss with the greens and serve.

6-8 servings

Note: To make ahead, combine everything but the greens and chill. Toss in the greens at the last minute.

Week’s Motivation: I will beat her!

 

I will beat her.

I will train harder.

I will eat cleaner.

I know her weaknesses.

I know her strengths.

I’ve lost to her before,

But not this time.

She is going down.

I have the advantage

because I know her well.

She is the old ME!

-pfitblog motivation

She is tough, but you are tougher.  If you need a quick Valentine’s Day recipe, check out my chocolate truffles as a family dessert.

https://eatlivefit.net/2015/02/13/a-sweet-for-your-sweet-tooth

 

 

 

Weekly Motivation 3: Stress

Despite common beliefs, stress can be a BIG influence on metabolism.   It freezes your body.  Now, who doesn’t have stress in your life?  Nobody, right? THE GOOD NEWS:  Stress can be changed and influenced.  We have to be aware of it and make small changes to reduce it.  Here is a quick, small way to reduce the effects of stress on your body.

Force your body into a state of calm.

Your body already has a built-in stress reliever, it’s just a matter of tapping into it.

“Focus on your breathing, put your feet flat on the floor. Smile even if you don’t feel like smiling,” Humphreys advised. “Tense your muscles then let them go, then tense them again and repeat. Relax your body and a lot of people will find your emotions will follow.*”

No better time than the present to do it..so take a few minutes and do it now.  Even if you are not feeling stressed, knowing that you have a way out of it, is huge!  Get in the habit of doing this several times a day and when stress hits, you will be ready with a remedy.

*source – Humphrey’s 

Back To School Means…BTY Time!

This time of year, as we get fall back into routines of school, work, and life, is the perfect time to make lifestyle changes.  Changes that will get results and are long lasting and focused on you.

Time to bring the focus Back To You (BTY)

Introducing

 BTY: Small Group Coaching from eatlivefit.net

As a Certified Nutrition Coach, I will provide online support through weekly conference calls, videos, a private social media group, and motivational texts.  Topics include:

  • Eating real food, limiting additives

  • How to balance the right fats, protein and carbohydrates

  • Keys to avoiding sugar and cravings

  • Helpful hints to make every meal simple and nutrient dense

  • and much more…

Cost: $85 per person for 4 weeks of coaching

Back To School price $69 per person

Interested? Contact me at eatlivefit@hotmail.com

or at (707) 408-3359

Sessions beginning soon! September 2016

Learn more about the real you.

 

Did you read the title and think, what the heck, I already know the “real” me so why do I need to read this article?  Let me tell you.

Time and time again, I can tell you that a struggle with food is less with food and more with YOU.  Being aware of the excuses you spout out for not following a nutrition plan is the first step.  This means listening to the voice inside your head.  Getting it down on paper is huge!  First, because it gets it out of your head.  Second, because you then can put a bit of perspective on it when you re-read it a few days or weeks later.  STOP making excuses for yourself and start becoming self-aware.

Get to know yourself, because you are changing everyday. Not the dark voice in your head, the REAL you.  Pick up a new notebook and a pen and start to peel back the layers of your own story, and get to know you.

 

Stuck?

 

If you are staring at a blank page and not sure how to start, here’s a “gimme topic” to get you writing:  Who are 5 people you can call when you want to vent, rather than picking up a bag of chips.  Why do you feel comfortable calling them?  GO!!!

This is what is important

It’s Just Cake people!

Just had to repost this article.  Such a good way to put food in perspective and develop a healthy relationship with it.  Wonderful testimony.  She and I are on the same page, this is what I love to help people do in their own lives!!!  Let me know how I can help you.

It’s Just Cake: How a Fat Loss Foodie Lifestyle Ended my Food Obsession
Leslie Ann Quillen October 27, 2015

I’ve been a foodie for as long as I can remember. Even as a little kid, I was fascinated by food.

When I was very little, I went through a phase where my answer to “What do you want to be when you grow up?” was “a pizza maker.”

I remember during Grandparent’s Day in first grade, my teacher Mrs. Robey had us make a book – complete with our own illustrations – about what we would do if we could spend the whole day with our grandparents.

I was not like the rest of the kids, who were planning out trips to zoos and amusement parks with grandma and grandpa.

Instead, my ideal day with my grandparents included a picnic and them taking me for ice cream, and probably a few other food-related activities as well.

My favorite birthday party? I don’t remember the little girl’s name or where I knew her from, but she had her birthday party at a pizza parlor and we got to go in the kitchen and learn how to throw dough and make our own pizzas from scratch. It was the best party I ever went to.

Food has always interested me. Learning where it comes from and how to make it. Spending time talking to the people who grow and raise our food. Preparing it, and then bringing people together to share it. I love it all.

AT WAR WITH FOOD

Somewhere along the way, late in high school I think, I became aware that food wasn’t all fun and games. I suddenly learned that food could cause me to gain weight, to go up a clothing size, to not look as cute or feel as confident as the other girls.

By college and the years that followed, I was in a full-on war with food.

During my internship in DC, we had Speaker Nights at the intern house that included home cooked dinners and always – always – some kind of pre-made/frozen dessert the intern parents had picked up from Costco. I considered it a badge of honor that I skipped dessert every week, and I remember the one time I didn’t. I stayed up until 1 a.m. running on the treadmill in the apartment gym to burn off the slice of cake.

Fast forward 15 years later, and thank goodness, my war with food is over and behind me. My unhealthy past relationship with food was one of the driving forces in becoming a nutrition coach: I didn’t want other women (especially young girls) to go through what I had gone through. Having a greater understanding of the impact food has on our hormones helped complete my healing process and put my food issues to rest.

They are still there of course, always lingering in the background.

I was reminded of them one night recently when my husband brought home a slice of cake for dessert as part of our “at-home date night.”

It wasn’t just any cake. It was chocolate cake. German chocolate cake, people…

Here is the aftermath:

One slice of cake. Two people. Two forks. And that is what remained.

You may be thinking:

“HOW DO YOU DO THAT?! How do you just leave perfectly good cake?! Wasn’t it good?! Then why didn’t you keep eating it?!
Here’s my why:

Because it’s just cake and it doesn’t have any power over me.

Since becoming a certified fat loss nutrition coach and personal trainer, I’ve worked with hundreds of women with food histories much like my own.

I TEACH WOMEN THAT FOOD IS NOT THE ENEMY.
I TEACH WOMEN HOW TO TAKE THE POWER AWAY FROM FOOD SO THAT IT’S JUST FOOD.
I TEACH WOMEN HOW TO COOK AND EAT REAL FOOD FOR FAT LOSS.

Because I didn’t see many nutrition coaches and trainers sharing recipes from Nigella Lawson or Bon Appetit magazine, I started to carve out a niche for myself with female foodies who wanted to get and stay lean while still enjoying cooking, eating, and sharing real food.

A FAT LOSS LIFESTYLE IS ABOUT EATING FOR HORMONAL BALANCE AND ACHIEVING FAT LOSS IN A SUSTAINABLE, EFFORTLESS WAY OVER TIME.

If you are seeking freedom from food, a Fat Loss Foodie Lifestyle can help you achieve hormonal balance and practice new behaviors around food.

Here are three principles I use in my coaching that help women overcome their food issues:

1. NOTHING IS OFF LIMITS

There are no “good foods” or “clean foods,” because it’s all ultimately just food. No labels, no emotions necessary. There is no school of thought or “team” that is better than any other (for example, Team Paleo vs. Team Vegan vs. Team If It Fits Your Macros) because we can all peacefully coexist AND achieve fat loss using any one of those approaches, as long as we honor our own unique metabolic expression, personality, and preferences.

Focus on eating more of the things that work for you and make you feel and perform your best, and limit the food that doesn’t serve you. For example, if you discover that dairy foods make you feel bloated and cause you to break out, that doesn’t mean you can never eat another bite of ice cream. It just means that on a daily basis, you can find ways to reduce your dairy intake and replace it with other things that work FOR you.

Make no mistake: Treat meals are part of a fat loss lifestyle, too, and we make a big deal out of our weekly pizza night or pasta night or burger night and make it an EVENT. Food should be celebrated and enjoyed, not eaten in secret and shame.

2. FOOD IS ABUNDANT

Look around you. Chances are, you could acquire food with very little effort, in very little time, from where you’re sitting right now as you read this. You probably have food in your bag, your desk, or a few steps away in the kitchen or office fridge. There’s probably a restaurant or convenience store or coffee shop just minutes away.

Here in America, food is everywhere we turn. So why do we eat as if it’s our last meal and we’ll never ever have another opportunity to eat a slice of pizza, a piece of cake, or a cookie? Why do we have to EAT IT ALL RIGHT NOW?

Last night, when I was indulging in a few bites of that insanely good German Chocolate Cake, I knew I didn’t have to scarf it down or eat it all. The bakery is a few blocks away. It’s not going anywhere. I can have it any time I want if that’s what I choose.

It’s just cake. And just because something tastes good, doesn’t mean you have to eat ALL of it.

3. THE LAW OF DIMINISHING RETURNS

There is a law in economics that states the more abundant a product is to consumers, the less they will want it. As supply goes up, demand goes down.

Apply this law the next time you’re face to face with a slice of chocolate cake, or any highly-palatable food that you feel driven to consume in its entirety.

Notice how the first bite, the second bite, the third bite – are sheer HEAVEN, but as you continue eating, it becomes less enjoyable. You keep eating more and more in search of that “pleasure fix” you got from the first bite, but it’s not there. It’s usually around the 4th or 5th bite for me, which is exactly where I stopped last night.

That’s when you put down your fork. Close the container. Walk to the fridge. Put it away for tomorrow when you can enjoy a few bites all over again.
I’m glad my guy brought home that slice of cake. It allowed me to reflect on how far I’ve come and how I can use what I’ve learned to help others. Now I welcome opportunities to practice making choices that serve me well, that give me freedom and make me feel powerful.

Cake doesn’t have ANY power over me, and it shouldn’t have any power over you.

It’s just cake.

What the pro’s do..do you?

Carmichael Coaching, a cycling coaching group, just outlined 6 important things that pro athletes do everyday.  Not saying you want to be a professional athlete here (perhaps you do), but I know I learn from the best, so I always have my ears open. The comments about “respect the rest” resonated with me.  I frequently don’t give that one the full attention it deserves.  Remember, muscles are built during the rest..not the work.

Check these out…

“ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT

Novice athletes, experienced athletes returning to sport after a long absence, and athletes with a lot of excess bodyweight typically make rapid and significant improvement. This makes sense because there’s a huge gap between their current performance level and their maximum potential. There’s a misconception, however, that experienced athletes and athletes who have been following structured training plans for a long time have only marginal gains left to accomplish. Unless you are a pro athlete or knocking on the door to be one there is still a substantial gap between your current performance level and your maximum potential. The gains you’re after are more challenging to achieve than the novice’s, and therefore require better planning and more precise execution, but we have yet to find the amateur athlete who doesn’t have room to improve his or her performance. Athletes who understand and embrace this always have something to train for.

GREAT SUPPORT SYSTEM

Athletes who improve their performance the most almost always enjoy the enthusiastic support of family members, friends, and training partners. The ideal scenario is not just that your family tolerates your training, but that they actively encourage it. It is similarly important for athletes to reciprocate that support (some of you can be a bit self-focused…) and provide opportunities for the people who support you to share in your accomplishments.

WILLINGNESS TO MAKE WIDE-RANGING LIFESTYLE CHANGES

A multi-faceted approach to improving performance is the way to go! It’s not just a focus on training that yields results. The people who improve the most are the ones who are willing to change the way they eat and the foods they eat. They’re willing to try new nutrition strategies during their training sessions and events. And they are also willing to alter some of their lifestyle habits to get more rest and reduce their overall stress levels. No one change triggers big improvements. It’s the cumulative impact of many small changes that yields massive results.

STRONG COMMUNICATION SKILLS

The strong silent type doesn’t usually achieve as much as the great communicator. While diligently following a training plan is important, it is equally important to provide your coach with subjective information about how the workouts feel, how you feel afterward, what you’re doing in between workouts, and about lifestyle stresses and time constraints. There’s a reason why CTS Coaching packages have more opportunities for communication than most coaching programs include at similar price points. A monthly conversation about your training – which is all that’s included in many coaching programs – is not enough. That’s a training plan with adjustments, not a coaching program. Only a fraction of the conversations between CTS Coaches and their athletes only focus on workouts. The majority of the conversations are about the athletes’ lives, balancing competing priorities, managing stress, and optimizing recovery and nutrition strategies.

CONSISTENCY

While many of the behaviors that help athletes improve the most involve activities outside of training, there is no substitute for completing the work of training. Successful athletes make training a priority, even if they don’t have much time to devote to workouts. Consistency is more important than any specific workout because it enables you to accumulate training stress in a methodical way. When training is haphazard and the times between training stimuli are unpredictable, you only achieve a portion of the potential adaptations.

RESPECT FOR REST

If you want to achieve greater improvements you have to take rest and recovery very seriously. Those athletes who regard rest as a necessary evil or something that can be disregarded do so at their peril. Under-recovery not only diminishes the adaptation you achieve from the work you’ve already done, but it also reduces the quality – and eventually the quantity – of work you can do in the future.

Some of you may read the list above and come to the conclusion that you are not capable of great improvement because you don’t have one more or of these things. That’s the wrong way to think about your future. There is no perfect athlete. It is unrealistic to believe you can attain perfection in the way you train, eat, rest, and balance your lifestyle. Being an athlete is not about being perfect, it’s about striving to make the most of the opportunities you have. And the more ways you try to optimize your training the more likely you are to tilt the balance in favor of continued and significant improvement!”