eatlivefit.net

Learn more about the real you.

 

Did you read the title and think, what the heck, I already know the “real” me so why do I need to read this article?  Let me tell you.

Time and time again, I can tell you that a struggle with food is less with food and more with YOU.  Being aware of the excuses you spout out for not following a nutrition plan is the first step.  This means listening to the voice inside your head.  Getting it down on paper is huge!  First, because it gets it out of your head.  Second, because you then can put a bit of perspective on it when you re-read it a few days or weeks later.  STOP making excuses for yourself and start becoming self-aware.

Get to know yourself, because you are changing everyday. Not the dark voice in your head, the REAL you.  Pick up a new notebook and a pen and start to peel back the layers of your own story, and get to know you.

 

Stuck?

 

If you are staring at a blank page and not sure how to start, here’s a “gimme topic” to get you writing:  Who are 5 people you can call when you want to vent, rather than picking up a bag of chips.  Why do you feel comfortable calling them?  GO!!!

This is what is important

Open House this Thursday

I am so proud to be working with a great group of professionals helping children and adults on the spectrum with speech, social skills, nutrition, and medical advice.

Come join us for an open house this Thursday, April 21st from 5-9pm in Aurora, CO.  Prizes, food and lots of giveaways.  See Re-Grand-Flyer-April-21 for more information.

It’s Just Cake people!

Just had to repost this article.  Such a good way to put food in perspective and develop a healthy relationship with it.  Wonderful testimony.  She and I are on the same page, this is what I love to help people do in their own lives!!!  Let me know how I can help you.

It’s Just Cake: How a Fat Loss Foodie Lifestyle Ended my Food Obsession
Leslie Ann Quillen October 27, 2015

I’ve been a foodie for as long as I can remember. Even as a little kid, I was fascinated by food.

When I was very little, I went through a phase where my answer to “What do you want to be when you grow up?” was “a pizza maker.”

I remember during Grandparent’s Day in first grade, my teacher Mrs. Robey had us make a book – complete with our own illustrations – about what we would do if we could spend the whole day with our grandparents.

I was not like the rest of the kids, who were planning out trips to zoos and amusement parks with grandma and grandpa.

Instead, my ideal day with my grandparents included a picnic and them taking me for ice cream, and probably a few other food-related activities as well.

My favorite birthday party? I don’t remember the little girl’s name or where I knew her from, but she had her birthday party at a pizza parlor and we got to go in the kitchen and learn how to throw dough and make our own pizzas from scratch. It was the best party I ever went to.

Food has always interested me. Learning where it comes from and how to make it. Spending time talking to the people who grow and raise our food. Preparing it, and then bringing people together to share it. I love it all.

AT WAR WITH FOOD

Somewhere along the way, late in high school I think, I became aware that food wasn’t all fun and games. I suddenly learned that food could cause me to gain weight, to go up a clothing size, to not look as cute or feel as confident as the other girls.

By college and the years that followed, I was in a full-on war with food.

During my internship in DC, we had Speaker Nights at the intern house that included home cooked dinners and always – always – some kind of pre-made/frozen dessert the intern parents had picked up from Costco. I considered it a badge of honor that I skipped dessert every week, and I remember the one time I didn’t. I stayed up until 1 a.m. running on the treadmill in the apartment gym to burn off the slice of cake.

Fast forward 15 years later, and thank goodness, my war with food is over and behind me. My unhealthy past relationship with food was one of the driving forces in becoming a nutrition coach: I didn’t want other women (especially young girls) to go through what I had gone through. Having a greater understanding of the impact food has on our hormones helped complete my healing process and put my food issues to rest.

They are still there of course, always lingering in the background.

I was reminded of them one night recently when my husband brought home a slice of cake for dessert as part of our “at-home date night.”

It wasn’t just any cake. It was chocolate cake. German chocolate cake, people…

Here is the aftermath:

One slice of cake. Two people. Two forks. And that is what remained.

You may be thinking:

“HOW DO YOU DO THAT?! How do you just leave perfectly good cake?! Wasn’t it good?! Then why didn’t you keep eating it?!
Here’s my why:

Because it’s just cake and it doesn’t have any power over me.

Since becoming a certified fat loss nutrition coach and personal trainer, I’ve worked with hundreds of women with food histories much like my own.

I TEACH WOMEN THAT FOOD IS NOT THE ENEMY.
I TEACH WOMEN HOW TO TAKE THE POWER AWAY FROM FOOD SO THAT IT’S JUST FOOD.
I TEACH WOMEN HOW TO COOK AND EAT REAL FOOD FOR FAT LOSS.

Because I didn’t see many nutrition coaches and trainers sharing recipes from Nigella Lawson or Bon Appetit magazine, I started to carve out a niche for myself with female foodies who wanted to get and stay lean while still enjoying cooking, eating, and sharing real food.

A FAT LOSS LIFESTYLE IS ABOUT EATING FOR HORMONAL BALANCE AND ACHIEVING FAT LOSS IN A SUSTAINABLE, EFFORTLESS WAY OVER TIME.

If you are seeking freedom from food, a Fat Loss Foodie Lifestyle can help you achieve hormonal balance and practice new behaviors around food.

Here are three principles I use in my coaching that help women overcome their food issues:

1. NOTHING IS OFF LIMITS

There are no “good foods” or “clean foods,” because it’s all ultimately just food. No labels, no emotions necessary. There is no school of thought or “team” that is better than any other (for example, Team Paleo vs. Team Vegan vs. Team If It Fits Your Macros) because we can all peacefully coexist AND achieve fat loss using any one of those approaches, as long as we honor our own unique metabolic expression, personality, and preferences.

Focus on eating more of the things that work for you and make you feel and perform your best, and limit the food that doesn’t serve you. For example, if you discover that dairy foods make you feel bloated and cause you to break out, that doesn’t mean you can never eat another bite of ice cream. It just means that on a daily basis, you can find ways to reduce your dairy intake and replace it with other things that work FOR you.

Make no mistake: Treat meals are part of a fat loss lifestyle, too, and we make a big deal out of our weekly pizza night or pasta night or burger night and make it an EVENT. Food should be celebrated and enjoyed, not eaten in secret and shame.

2. FOOD IS ABUNDANT

Look around you. Chances are, you could acquire food with very little effort, in very little time, from where you’re sitting right now as you read this. You probably have food in your bag, your desk, or a few steps away in the kitchen or office fridge. There’s probably a restaurant or convenience store or coffee shop just minutes away.

Here in America, food is everywhere we turn. So why do we eat as if it’s our last meal and we’ll never ever have another opportunity to eat a slice of pizza, a piece of cake, or a cookie? Why do we have to EAT IT ALL RIGHT NOW?

Last night, when I was indulging in a few bites of that insanely good German Chocolate Cake, I knew I didn’t have to scarf it down or eat it all. The bakery is a few blocks away. It’s not going anywhere. I can have it any time I want if that’s what I choose.

It’s just cake. And just because something tastes good, doesn’t mean you have to eat ALL of it.

3. THE LAW OF DIMINISHING RETURNS

There is a law in economics that states the more abundant a product is to consumers, the less they will want it. As supply goes up, demand goes down.

Apply this law the next time you’re face to face with a slice of chocolate cake, or any highly-palatable food that you feel driven to consume in its entirety.

Notice how the first bite, the second bite, the third bite – are sheer HEAVEN, but as you continue eating, it becomes less enjoyable. You keep eating more and more in search of that “pleasure fix” you got from the first bite, but it’s not there. It’s usually around the 4th or 5th bite for me, which is exactly where I stopped last night.

That’s when you put down your fork. Close the container. Walk to the fridge. Put it away for tomorrow when you can enjoy a few bites all over again.
I’m glad my guy brought home that slice of cake. It allowed me to reflect on how far I’ve come and how I can use what I’ve learned to help others. Now I welcome opportunities to practice making choices that serve me well, that give me freedom and make me feel powerful.

Cake doesn’t have ANY power over me, and it shouldn’t have any power over you.

It’s just cake.

What the pro’s do..do you?

Carmichael Coaching, a cycling coaching group, just outlined 6 important things that pro athletes do everyday.  Not saying you want to be a professional athlete here (perhaps you do), but I know I learn from the best, so I always have my ears open. The comments about “respect the rest” resonated with me.  I frequently don’t give that one the full attention it deserves.  Remember, muscles are built during the rest..not the work.

Check these out…

“ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT

Novice athletes, experienced athletes returning to sport after a long absence, and athletes with a lot of excess bodyweight typically make rapid and significant improvement. This makes sense because there’s a huge gap between their current performance level and their maximum potential. There’s a misconception, however, that experienced athletes and athletes who have been following structured training plans for a long time have only marginal gains left to accomplish. Unless you are a pro athlete or knocking on the door to be one there is still a substantial gap between your current performance level and your maximum potential. The gains you’re after are more challenging to achieve than the novice’s, and therefore require better planning and more precise execution, but we have yet to find the amateur athlete who doesn’t have room to improve his or her performance. Athletes who understand and embrace this always have something to train for.

GREAT SUPPORT SYSTEM

Athletes who improve their performance the most almost always enjoy the enthusiastic support of family members, friends, and training partners. The ideal scenario is not just that your family tolerates your training, but that they actively encourage it. It is similarly important for athletes to reciprocate that support (some of you can be a bit self-focused…) and provide opportunities for the people who support you to share in your accomplishments.

WILLINGNESS TO MAKE WIDE-RANGING LIFESTYLE CHANGES

A multi-faceted approach to improving performance is the way to go! It’s not just a focus on training that yields results. The people who improve the most are the ones who are willing to change the way they eat and the foods they eat. They’re willing to try new nutrition strategies during their training sessions and events. And they are also willing to alter some of their lifestyle habits to get more rest and reduce their overall stress levels. No one change triggers big improvements. It’s the cumulative impact of many small changes that yields massive results.

STRONG COMMUNICATION SKILLS

The strong silent type doesn’t usually achieve as much as the great communicator. While diligently following a training plan is important, it is equally important to provide your coach with subjective information about how the workouts feel, how you feel afterward, what you’re doing in between workouts, and about lifestyle stresses and time constraints. There’s a reason why CTS Coaching packages have more opportunities for communication than most coaching programs include at similar price points. A monthly conversation about your training – which is all that’s included in many coaching programs – is not enough. That’s a training plan with adjustments, not a coaching program. Only a fraction of the conversations between CTS Coaches and their athletes only focus on workouts. The majority of the conversations are about the athletes’ lives, balancing competing priorities, managing stress, and optimizing recovery and nutrition strategies.

CONSISTENCY

While many of the behaviors that help athletes improve the most involve activities outside of training, there is no substitute for completing the work of training. Successful athletes make training a priority, even if they don’t have much time to devote to workouts. Consistency is more important than any specific workout because it enables you to accumulate training stress in a methodical way. When training is haphazard and the times between training stimuli are unpredictable, you only achieve a portion of the potential adaptations.

RESPECT FOR REST

If you want to achieve greater improvements you have to take rest and recovery very seriously. Those athletes who regard rest as a necessary evil or something that can be disregarded do so at their peril. Under-recovery not only diminishes the adaptation you achieve from the work you’ve already done, but it also reduces the quality – and eventually the quantity – of work you can do in the future.

Some of you may read the list above and come to the conclusion that you are not capable of great improvement because you don’t have one more or of these things. That’s the wrong way to think about your future. There is no perfect athlete. It is unrealistic to believe you can attain perfection in the way you train, eat, rest, and balance your lifestyle. Being an athlete is not about being perfect, it’s about striving to make the most of the opportunities you have. And the more ways you try to optimize your training the more likely you are to tilt the balance in favor of continued and significant improvement!”

Freeing Truth..Life Stress vs. Metabolism

I have had many conversations with many clients about just this topic..stress.  Who doesn’t have stress in their life?  We all feel it and it impacts our life in many ways.  Stress manifests itself in many forms throughout our day.  It may be a “positive” stress, like motivation to get a project done..or a workout completed; or a “negative” source such as anxiety.  I couldn’t have said this better myself, so why try…

“Wanna know some frustrating yet freeing truth? 😬
Your metabolism is not worried about your physique or desire to lose weight. All your metabolism is programmed to do is sense threats in the environment & react appropriately to keep you surviving. It seeks to balance & recover from stress.
That means that you may be eating perfectly clean & exercising every day, but if you’re stressing yourself out about it, your metabolism is going to seek out your recovery and survival from stress first before it lets go of that body fat.
Modern-day stressors include lack of sleep, overexercise, excessively decreasing calories, giving birth, and of course emotional/mental stress from work, relationships, etc.
If you feel you’re working super hard to lose that holiday (or year-long 😬) weight gain but it’s not working, maybe try to look into these other factors and see where your body is resisting due to stress. Are you getting enough sleep? Are you eating enough nourishing foods? Are you stressed out? Even worse- are you SO concerned with getting leaner that it’s actually stressing you out?
This is freeing because our body is on our side– working for us to keep us healthy and balanced. We just have to take the signs from our metabolism (hunger, energy, cravings, fat loss/gain) and work with it, not against it.” by kitchenspired

I strive to help people get their metabolism back on track and burning up those calories and fat.  I will help you identify the sources of stress in your life that are affecting your metabolism.  I don’t sell gimmicks or any products, just valuable advice and balanced eating to help your body be the best it can be right now.

It really angers me that there are so many “get quick results” promises out there today that claim the labels “nutrition and health.”  Let me be the first to tell you, that often those sources will mess with your metabolism in more harmful ways in the long run.  If you are sick of all the hype and want to get your engine running, see food as fuel, and sustain a truly healthy lifestyle, then I am here to help!  eatlivefit@hotmail.com

Refined Sugar vs. Saturated Fat – new research

The tables have definitely turned over the last century. Goes against all logic that sugar would be worse for you than butter, right? Complicated but here is a window into the research.  This does NOT mean that butter is “good” for you now.  Everything in moderation!  The key here is to pick your sweets and fats where you REALLY REALLY want them, not everywhere and all the time.  Whole food is the best choice for the majority of time.  Here’s the science…

Refined Sugar vs. Saturated Fat: What’s More Likely To Cause Coronary Heart Disease?

Heart Disease 

With coronary heart disease (CHD) killing more than 370,000 people every year in the United States, a team of researchers from Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute and Albert Einstein College of Medicine were interested in seeing what’s worse for the heart — saturated fats or refined sugars? Their findings, published in Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases, argues that, after years of believing fat was worse, it could have been sugar all along.

“We now have more than a half century of data as well as increased understanding of how nutrition impacts the body and specifically coronary heart disease,” said the study’s co-author James DiNicolantonio, a cardiovascular research scientist at the American Heart Institute, in a press release. “After a thorough analysis of the evidence it seems appropriate to recommend dietary guidelines shift focus away from recommendations to reduce saturated fat and toward recommendations to avoid added sugars. Most importantly recommendations should support the eating of whole foods whenever possible and the avoidance of ultra-processed food.”

The research team put its theory to the test and found after just a few weeks of participants consuming a diet high in refined (processed) sugar, those with CHD began to experience several signs of heart abnormalities, like higher levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL (bad cholesterol), and lower levels of HDL (good cholesterol), all of which increase their risk of heart disease. Meanwhile, saturated fats increased levels of LDL, but in doing so also increased levels of HDL, making their negative impact on the heart less dangerous compared to sugar. Ultimately, this led researchers to conclude in their study that “sugar consumption, particularly in the form of refined added sugars, are a greater contributor to CHD than saturated fats.” 

In addition, consuming large quantities of processed sugar, such as high fructose corn syrup and table sugar can lead to leptin resistance — leptin is a hormone responsible for regulating normal body weight. Diets high in processed sugars promote type 2 diabetes, which also lead to a much greater risk for CHD compared to patients maintaining a healthy diet.

Saturated fats have been demonized for years, subsequently leading many consumers to avoid animal products like red meat, poultry, and dairy. These types of fat were first blamed for causing high rates of heart disease in the 1950s, when scientist Ancel Keys observed those who ate diets high in saturated fats also had higher rates of heart disease. But those same people were also eating a lot of refined sugar. DiNicolantonio pointed out this is the reason why past studies, which the longstanding guidelines have been based on, found saturated fats had a negative impact on heart health. The studies were largely observational, however, and didn’t involve intensive investigation. Had past researchers conducted proper studies to determine the cause of CHD, they would’ve realized sooner that refined sugar impacts risk more. Today, troves of evidence-based research have overwhelmed the weaker observational studies, revealing Keys was wrong all along.

Most recently, a study published in the journal Circulation, found drinking sugary drinks each day increased dangerous fat in the body and increased risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Another study, published in the journal Heart, found people who drank at least two sugary drinks a day increased their risk of heart failure by 25 percent.

Source: O’Keefe JH, DiNicolantonio JJ, and Lucan SC. The Evidence for Saturated Fat and For Sugar Related to Coronary Heart Disease. Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases. 2016.

January 6th: You are not a failure!

You know what I’m talking about.  You started on January 1st, rearing to go on the new you.  Whether that be to move more or eat better, your ducks were in a row.  Then, last night, after a long day at work and feeling the stress of life creeping back in, you dove into a bag of chips or cookies while watching your favorite show.

You look around you and everyone else seems to have it together.  You are surrounded by:

  • The mom sporting yoga pants in perfect shape with 4 kids getting into her new shiny SUV…
  • The couple working out together who seem to never fight or tire of one another
  • Or the guy at work that spends long hours at his desk getting mountains of work done and still finds time to stay trim and fit…

Some days it feels like EVERYONE is doing better than you, right?  STOP right there!!!

Perception is often not reality.  Want to know their secret?  Guess what, they’re struggling too.  How do I know? Because I coach many of them.

Everyone Else is NOT okay and you fit right in.  Life is messy, imperfect, wonderful and yet faulted in many ways.  Life is full of ups and downs, hangnails, laughter, alarms blaring when we are sound asleep, funny memories, wrinkles, decisions, jobs, kids, pets, temptations, songs, (fill in the blank) for all of us.

Which means that Everyone is NOT always doing okay.  Sit with that for a second.  STOP worrying about being the only person who doesn’t have it “all together.” I remember a poem I read that said, there will always be someone smarter, more together, faster, fitter, etc.  You are who you are for a reason and it is time to work on just you!

Instead, START:

  • to work on the areas of your life that you can influence
  • work on fitness and nutrition goals that are actually realistic and attainable
  • feel good about what you are doing right everyday, no matter how small
  • Learn to be OK with being “not OK”
  • Let things be messy

Perhaps today is your day to wear the baby barf pants to the grocery store to fill a prescription.  Or it is your day to chase your dog down the street in your heels as he escapes when you get home from work.  You won’t be the first one to do that, nor the last. You are normal right along with the rest of us.

I’m here to help:

Small Group coaching is starting THIS MONTH. Online Small Group Nutrition Coaching and Nutrition Seminars at Trails Recreation Center.  Contact me for more information about either at eatlivefit@hotmail.com or via eatlivefit.net.

 

 

“Stay Ahead of the Holiday Gain” workshop

Come learn fitness and nutrition tips to keep your holiday season from giving you the gift of added weight.

It’s the last two days to register for the “Stay Ahead of the Gain” workshop.  See details in the link below. Register online or in person at the Trails Recreation Center.

Stay Ahead of the Gain

 

Negative thinking may be sabotaging your results.

I pride myself on bringing honesty into my relationships and that rings true to my professional endeavors also.  I approach every client with honesty and integrity.  Do I do nutrition right in my life everyday, day in day out?  NO!  Am I always working to make my nutrition more balanced, yes!  Especially in this new “season of perimenopause.”  I frequently loose and gain a few pounds, but I always know that I can rev my metabolism to get back to my ideal power to weight ratio.  There is not a quick fix, no pill, no instant result unless you want to do it in a manner that will not last.  I am interested in ways to keep my weight balanced and hormones healthy for the rest of my life, not just a short term.Negative thinking

I love how one article sums up just how negative thoughts about weight gains and losses can influence health in a nut shell…

“It likely doesn’t surprise you to learn that the mind and the body are intimately connected. But it may surprise you to learn that there is a growing body of research that suggests negative thoughts and emotions can be linked to poor health conditions.

Cynicism seems to be real trouble, for example. A 2014 study published in Neurology linked high levels of cynicism later in life with a greater risk of dementia and this was after accounting for other risk factors like age, sex, certain heart health markers, smoking status, and more.
Cynicism may also be bad for your heart. A 2009 study published in Circulation looked at data from close to 100,000 women and found that those who were cynical were more likely to have heart disease. And the cynical women were more likely to die during the course of the study than those who had a sunnier disposition.

Hostility isn’t such a grand thing to carry either. The journal Stroke found that people who scored higher on measures of unfriendliness as well as those who had chronic stress and depressive symptoms were more likely to have a stroke.
We cannot talk about negative thoughts without mentioning depression. This serious diagnosis can have an impact in several aspects of your health. It has been linked to an increased risk for type-2 diabetes, heart attack and a greater chance of disability later in life.
Emotions are powerful when it comes to our health. One theory is that when you are stressed out or depressed cortisol levels increase making your immune system less able to control inflammation making you more susceptible to disease.
It could also be that people who have a negative outlook are more likely to smoke and drink and less likely to be physically active. A bit of a chicken and egg question and hard to answer definitively.
But all is not lost, Debbie Downer. By changing your perspective, you can change your health. Our brains are constantly creating new pathways and regenerating cells. This process is key to lots of functions including mood stabilization. It is possible to create your own positive pathways.(www.bodyrock.tv/health/negative-thinking-making-sick/#ixzz3fPS76sJQ)

If this rings true to you, then it is NEVER too late to make a change.  Being aware of how you are really feeling and stopping that mindless reaching for satisfaction (whether it be the cookie jar or something else) is HUGE.  When cortisol levels are high, your weight loss, or fitness and nutrition goals are slowed down. Don’t go one more day thinking this way, but take small steps to recognize the stressors and remove yourself from them or in some cases them from you.  That is the down and dirty for today.